TechTalks from event: Technical session talks from ICRA 2012

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RGB-D Localization and Mapping

  • Efficient Scene Simulation for Robust Monte Carlo Localization Using an RGB-D Camera Authors: Fallon, Maurice; Johannsson, Hordur; Leonard, John
    This paper presents Kinect Monte Carlo Localization (KMCL), a new method for localization in three dimensional indoor environments using RGB-D cameras, such as the Microsoft Kinect. The approach makes use of a low fidelity a priori 3-D model of the area of operation composed of large planar segments, such as walls and ceilings, which are assumed to remain static. Using this map as input, the KMCL algorithm employs feature-based visual odometry as the particle propagation mechanism and utilizes the 3-D map and the underlying sensor image formation model to efficiently simulate RGB-D camera views at the location of particle poses, using a graphical processing unit (GPU). The generated 3D views of the scene are then used to evaluate the likelihood of the particle poses. This GPU implementation provides a factor of ten speedup over a pure distance-based method, yet provides comparable accuracy. Experimental results are presented for five different configurations, including: (1) a robotic wheelchair, (2) a sensor mounted on a person, (3) an Ascending Technologies quadrotor, (4) a Willow Garage PR2, and (5) an RWI B21 wheeled mobile robot platform. The results demonstrate that the system can perform robust localization with 3D information for motions as fast as 1.5 meters per second. The approach is designed to be applicable not just for robotics but other applications such as wearable computing.
  • Robust Egomotion Estimation Using ICP in Inverse Depth Coordinates Authors: Lui, Wen Lik Dennis; Tang, Titus Jia Jie; Drummond, Tom; Li, Wai Ho
    This paper presents a 6 degrees of freedom egomotion estimation method using Iterative Closest Point (ICP) for low cost and low accuracy range cameras such as the Microsoft Kinect. Instead of Euclidean coordinates, the method uses inverse depth coordinates which better conforms to the error characteristics of raw sensor data. Novel inverse depth formulations of point-to-point and point-to-plane error metrics are derived as part of our implementation. The implemented system runs in real time at an average of 28 frames per second (fps) on a standard computer. Extensive experiments were performed to evaluate different combinations of error metrics and parameters. Results show that our system is accurate and robust across a variety of motion trajectories. The point-to-plane error metric was found to be the best at coping with large inter-frame motion while remaining accurate and maintaining real time performance.
  • Online Egomotion Estimation of RGB-D Sensors Using Spherical Harmonics Authors: Osteen, Philip; Owens, Jason; Kessens, Chad C.
    We present a technique to estimate the egomotion of an RGB-D sensor based on rotations of functions defined on the unit sphere. In contrast to traditional approaches, our technique is not based on image features and does not require correspondences to be generated between frames of data. Instead, consecutive functions are correlated using spherical harmonic analysis. An Extended Gaussian Image (EGI), created from the local normal estimates of a point cloud, defines each function. Correlations are efficiently computed using Fourier transformations, resulting in a 3 Degree of Freedom (3-DoF) rotation estimate. An Iterative Closest Point (ICP) process then refines the initial rotation estimate and adds a translational component, yielding a full 6-DoF egomotion estimate. The focus of this work is to investigate the merits of using spherical harmonic analysis for egomotion estimation by comparison with alternative 6-DoF methods. We compare the performance of the proposed technique with that of stand-alone ICP and image feature based methods. As with other egomotion techniques, estimation errors accumulate and degrade results, necessitating correction mechanisms for robust localization. For this report, however, we use the raw estimates; no filtering or smoothing processes are applied. In-house and external benchmark data sets are analyzed for both runtime and accuracy. Results show that the algorithm is competitive in terms of both accuracy and runtime, and future work will aim to
  • Incremental Registration of RGB-D Images Authors: Dryanovski, Ivan; Jaramillo, Carlos; Xiao, Jizhong
    An RGB-D camera is a sensor which outputs range and color information about objects. Recent technological advances in this area have introduced affordable RGB-D devices in the robotics community. In this paper, we present a real-time technique for 6-DoF camera pose estimation through the incremental registration of RGB-D images. First, a set of edge features are computed from the depth and color images. An initial motion estimation is calculated through aligning the features. This initial guess is refined by applying the Iterative Closest Point algorithm on the dense point cloud data. A rigorous error analysis assesses several sets of RGB-D ground truth data via an error accumulation metric. We show that the proposed two-stage approach significantly reduces error in the pose estimation, compared to a state-of-the-art ICP registration technique.
  • An Evaluation of the RGB-D SLAM System Authors: Endres, Felix; Hess, Juergen Michael; Engelhard, Nikolas; Sturm, Jürgen; Cremers, Daniel; Burgard, Wolfram
    We present an approach to simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) for RGB-D cameras like the Microsoft Kinect. Our system concurrently estimates the trajectory of a hand-held Kinect and generates a dense 3D model of the environment. We present the key features of our approach and evaluate its performance thoroughly on a recently published dataset, including a large set of sequences of different scenes with varying camera speeds and illumination conditions. In particular, we evaluate the accuracy, robustness, and processing time for three different feature descriptors (SIFT, SURF, and ORB). The experiments demonstrate that our system can robustly deal with difficult data in common indoor scenarios while being fast enough for online operation. Our system is fully available as open-source.
  • Depth Camera Based Indoor Mobile Robot Localization and Navigation Authors: Biswas, Joydeep; Veloso, Manuela
    The sheer volume of data generated by depth cameras provides a challenge to process in real time, in particular when used for indoor mobile robot localization and navigation. We introduce the Fast Sampling Plane Filtering (FSPF) algorithm to reduce the volume of the 3D point cloud by sampling points from the depth image, and classifying local grouped sets of points as belonging to planes in 3D (the "plane filtered" points) or points that do not correspond to planes within a specified error margin (the "outlier" points). We then introduce a localization algorithm based on an observation model that down-projects the plane filtered points on to 2D, and assigns correspondences for each point to lines in the 2D map. The full sampled point cloud (consisting of both plane filtered as well as outlier points) is processed for obstacle avoidance for autonomous navigation. All our algorithms process only the depth information, and do not require additional RGB data. The FSPF, localization and obstacle avoidance algorithms run in real time at full camera frame rates(30Hz) with low CPU requirements(16%). We provide experimental results demonstrating the effectiveness of our approach for indoor mobile robot localization and navigation. We further compare the accuracy and robustness in localization using depth cameras with FSPF vs. alternative approaches that simulate laser rangefinder scans from the 3D data.