TechTalks from event: IEEE IPDPS 2011

Note 1: Only plenary sessions (keynotes, panels, and best papers) are accessible without requiring log-in. For other talks, you will need to log-in using the email you registered for IPDPS 2011. Note 2: Many of the talks (those without a thumbnail next to the their description below) are yet to be uploaded. Some of them were not recorded because of technical problems. We are working with the corresponding authors to upload the self-recorded versions here. We sincerely thank all authors for their efforts in making their videos available.

SESSION 8: Reliability and Security

  • Hauberk: Lightweight Silent Data Corruption Error Detector for GPGPU Authors: Keun Soo Yim (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA); Cuong Pham (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA); M
    High performance and relatively low cost of GPU-based platforms provide an attractive alternative for general purpose high performance computing (HPC). However, the emerging HPC applications have usually stricter output correctness requirements than typical GPU applications (i.e., 3D graphics). This paper ?rst analyzes the error resiliency of GPGPU platforms using a fault injection tool we have developed for commodity GPU devices. On average, 16-33% of injected faults cause silent data corruption (SDC) errors in the HPC programs executing on GPU. This SDC ratio is signi?-cantly higher than that measured in CPU programs (<2.3%). In order to tolerate SDC errors, customized error detectors are strategically placed in the source code of target GPU programs so as to minimize performance impact and error propagation and maximize recoverability. The presented Hauberk technique is deployed in seven HPC benchmark programs and evaluated using a fault injection. The results show a high average error detection coverage (87%) with a small performance overhead (15%).
  • A Performance and Area Efficient Architecture for Intrusion Detection Systems Authors: Govind Sreekar Shenoy (Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Spain); Jordi Tubella (Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Spain)
    Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS) have emerged as one of the most promising ways to secure systems in network. An IDS operates by scanning packet-data for known signatures and accordingly takes requisite action. However, scanning bytes in the packet payload and checking for more than 20,000 signatures becomes a computationally intensive task. Additionally, with signatures doubling almost every 30 months, this complexity will aggravate further. IDS commonly uses the Aho-Corasick state machine based search to scan packets for signatures. However, the huge size of the state machine negatively impacts the performance and area ef?ciency of the underlying hardware. In this work, we propose novel mechanisms to compactly store the state machine thereby improving the area ef?ciency. We observe over 2X reduction in area for storing the state machine in comparison to BS-FSM [19]. We investigate various approaches to improve the performance ef?ciency. We pipeline the processing of consecutive bytes accessing the upper-most level, the frequently accessed level, of the state machine. In order to further enhance the performance ef?ciency, we use a dedicated hardware unit speci?cally tuned for traversal using our proposed storage mechanism. We observe that our proposed architecture outperforms BS-FSM based approaches [13, 14, 19]
  • Time-Ordered Event Traces: A New Debugging Primitive for Concurrency Bugs Authors: Martin Dimitrov (University of Central Florida, USA); Huiyang Zhou (North Carolina State University, USA)
    Non-determinism makes concurrent bugs extremely dif?cult to reproduce and to debug. In this work, we propose a new debugging primitive to facilitate the debugging process by exposing this non-deterministic behavior to the programmer. The key idea is to generate a time-ordered trace of events such as function calls/returns and memory accesses across different threads. The architectural support for this primitive is lightweight, including a high-precision, frequency-invariant timestamp counter and an event trace buffer in each processor core. The proposed primitive continuously records and timestamps the last N function calls/returns per core by default, and can also be con?gured to watch speci?c memory addresses or code regions through a ?exible software interface. To examine the effectiveness of the proposed primitive, we studied a variety of concurrent bugs in large commercial software and our results show that exposing the time-ordered information, function calls/returns in particular, to the programmer is highly bene?cial for diagnosing the root causes of these bugs.