TechTalks from event: IEEE IPDPS 2011

Note 1: Only plenary sessions (keynotes, panels, and best papers) are accessible without requiring log-in. For other talks, you will need to log-in using the email you registered for IPDPS 2011. Note 2: Many of the talks (those without a thumbnail next to the their description below) are yet to be uploaded. Some of them were not recorded because of technical problems. We are working with the corresponding authors to upload the self-recorded versions here. We sincerely thank all authors for their efforts in making their videos available.

SESSION 22: Fault Tolerance

  • Flease - Lease Coordination Without a Lock Server Authors: Björn Kolbeck (Zuse Institute Berlin, Germany); Mikael Högqvist (Zuse Institute Berlin, Germany); Jan Stender (Zuse I
    Large-scale distributed systems often require scalable and fault-tolerant mechanisms to coordinate exclusive access to shared resources such as ?les, replicas or the primary role. The best known algorithms to implement distributed mutual exclusion with leases, such as Multipaxos, are complex, dif?cult to implement, and rely on stable storage to persist lease information. In this paper we present FLEASE, an algorithm for fault-tolerant lease coordination in distributed systems that is simpler than Multipaxos and does not rely on stable storage. The evaluation shows that FLEASE can be used to implement scalable, decentralized lease coordination that outperforms a central lock service implementation by an order of magnitude.
  • Uncoordinated Checkpointing Without Domino Effect for Send-Deterministic MPI Applications Authors: Amina Guermouche (University of Paris South 11, France); Thomas Ropars (INRIA, France); Elisabeth Brunet (Télécom
    As reported by many recent studies, the mean time between failures of future post-petascale supercomputers is likely to reduce, compared to the current situation. The most popular fault tolerance approach for MPI applications on HPC Platforms relies on coordinated checkpointing which raises two major issues: a) global restart wastes energy since all processes are forced to rollback even in the case of a single failure; b) checkpoint coordination may slow down the application execution because of congestions on I/O resources. Alternative approaches based on uncoordinated checkpointing and message logging require logging all messages, imposing a high memory/storage occupation and a signi?cant overhead on communications. It has recently been observed that many MPI HPC applications are send-deterministic, allowing to design new fault tolerance protocols. In this paper, we propose an uncoordinated checkpointing protocol for send-deterministic MPI HPC applications that (i) logs only a subset of the application messages and (ii) does not require to restart systematically all processes when a failure occurs. We ?rst describe our protocol and prove its correctness. Through experimental evaluations, we show that its implementation in MPICH2 has a negligible overhead on application performance. Then we perform a quantitative evaluation of the properties of our protocol using the NAS Benchmarks. Using a clustering approach, we demonstrate that this protocol actually succeeds to combine the two expected properties: a) it logs only a small fraction of the messages and b) it reduces by a factor approaching 2 the average number of processes to rollback compared to coordinated checkpointing.
  • Minimal Obstructions for the Coordinated Attack Problem and Beyond Authors: Tristan Fevat (Aix-Marseille Université, France); Emmanuel Godard (Pims, Cnrs Umi, France)
    We consider the well known Coordinated Attack Problem, where two generals have to decide on a common attack, when their messengers can be captured by the enemy. Informally, this problem represents the dif?culties to agree in the present of communication faults. We consider here only omission faults (loss of message), but contrary to previous studies, we do not to restrict the way messages can be lost, ie. we use no speci?c failure metric. Our contribution is threefold. First, we introduce the study of arbitrary patterns of failure (”omission schemes”), proposing notions and notations that revealed very convenient to handle. In the large subclass of omission schemes where the double simultaneous omission can never happen, we characterize which one are obstructions for the Coordinated Attack Problem. We present then some interesting applications. We show for the ?rst time that the well studied omission scheme, where at most one message can be lost at each round, is a kind of least worst case environment for the Coordinated Attack Problem. We also extend our study to networks of arbitrary size. In particular, we address an open question of Santoro and Widmayer about the Consensus Problem in communication networks with omission faults.
  • Scheduling Parallel Iterative Applications on Volatile Resources Authors: Henri Casanova (University of Hawaii at Manoa, USA); Fanny Dufossé (LIP, ENS Lyon, France); Yves Robert (ENS Lyon, Franc
    In this paper we study the execution of iterative applications on volatile processors such as those found on desktop grids. We develop master-worker scheduling schemes that attempt to achieve good trade-offs between worker speed and worker availability. A key feature of our approach is that we consider a communication model where the bandwidth capacity of the master for sending application data to workers is limited. This limitation makes the scheduling problem more dif?cult both in a theoretical sense and in a practical sense. Furthermore, we consider that a processor can be in one of three states: available, down, or temporarily preempted by its owner. This preempted state also complicates the scheduling problem. In practical settings, e.g., desktop grids, master bandwidth is limited and processors are temporarily reclaimed. Consequently, addressing the aforementioned dif?culties is necessary for successfully deploying master-worker applications on volatile platforms. Our ?rst contribution is to determine the complexity of the scheduling problem in its off-line version, i.e., when processor availability behaviors are known in advance. Even with this knowledge, the problem is NP-hard, and cannot be approximated within a factor 8=7. Our second contribution is a closed-form formula for the expectation of the time needed by a worker to complete a set of tasks. This formula relies on a Markovian assumption for the temporal availability of processors, and is at the heart of some heuristics that aim at favoring “reliable” processors in a sensible manner. Our third contribution is a set of heuristics, which we evaluate in simulation. Our results provide guidance to selecting the best strategy as a function of processor state availability versus average task duration.